Proctoscopy Test

Proctoscopy is a common medical procedure in which an instrument called a proctoscope (also known as a rectoscope, although the latter may be a bit longer) is used to examine the anal cavity, rectum or sigmoid colon. A proctoscope is a short, straight, rigid, hollow metal tube, and usually has a small light bulb mounted at the end. It is approximately 5 inches or 15 cm long, while a rectoscope is approximately 10 inches or 25 cm long. During proctoscopy, the proctoscope is lubricated and inserted into the rectum, and then the obturator is removed, allowing an unobstructed view of the interior of the rectal cavity. This procedure is normally done to inspect for hemorrhoids or rectal polyps and might be mildly uncomfortable as the proctoscope is inserted further into the rectum. Modern fibre-optic proctoscopes allow more extensive observation with less discomfort. This procedure is to be performed in good hospital settings only.

Advantage: Proctocopy helps complete visualisation of the anal cavity; the abnormalities can then be corrected with appropriate medications and surgical interventions.

FAQs:

What is the treatment option for haemorroids?

Haemorroids usually need to be controlled and managed with change in diet, lifestyle, medications and local applications at the anal opening. In severe haemmorroidal diseases surgery is the only option.

How does proctoscopy help?

Proctoscopy helps to visualise the entire rectal cavity and grade the severity of the rectal anal diseases such as fissures, obstructions, polyps, haemorroids etc.

Does the patient need to be hospitalised?

Yes; an overnight stay at the hospital is necessary following liquid diet for three days and enema a night before the procedure to clear the entire rectum.

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